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China makes new claim in eastern border with Bhutan

The Sakteng wildlife sanctuary in eastern Bhutan’s Trashigang district is spread across 650 sq km and has not been disputed by China in the past

The China government’s decision for the first time to publicly put on record that it has a boundary dispute with Bhutan in the eastern sector is a calibrated manner of launching a diplomatic attack on Thimphu’s ally India on a new front.

The key could be the proximity of Bhutan’s “eastern sector” to Arunachal Pradesh – which China claims in its entirety as part of “south Tibet” : It could be the primary reason for Beijing to talk about differing boundary perceptions with Bhutan now.

First at a multilateral environment forum in June, where India was present, and then through a statement to media, the Chinese foreign ministry has said it has a border dispute with Bhutan in the eastern sector, surprising many who are following developments in the region.

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The Sakteng wildlife sanctuary in eastern Bhutan’s Trashigang district is spread across 650 sq km and has not been disputed by China in the past. To complicate matters further the Chinese foreign ministry in a statement said “a third party should not point fingers” in the China-Bhutan border issue – an apparent reference to India.

Days before a blowout in its Baghjan oil field bordering the Dibru Saikhowa national park in Assam put “all life forms” in the vicinity at risk, Oil India Limited (OIL) obtained environment clearance for exploring and extracting gas from inside the park — despite restrictions in the mining lease on carrying out surveys inside sanctuaries and national parks.

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The Chinese foreign ministry said the China-Bhutan boundary has never been delimited and there “have been disputes over the eastern, central and western sections for a long time”. The statement in Mandarin further said “a third party should not point fingers” in the China-Bhutan border issue – an apparent reference to India.

Referring to Chinese foreign ministry’s statement saying the disputes in the three areas have been there “for a long time”, Constantino Xavier, fellow in foreign policy studies at the think-tank Brookings India, said the timing chosen by Beijing to raise the issue – amid the ongoing Sino-India border tension — was important.

“Even while this Chinese claim may not be new, the timing and the multilateral setting of Beijing’s statement reflect intent to put pressure on Bhutan and India, seeking to create a wedge between both countries,” Xavier said.

“You got to see the Chinese claims in continuation to their strategy of territorial claims elsewhere,” a New Delhi-based Asia expert said on condition of anonymity.

In 2018 July, vice foreign minister Kong Xuanyou led a rare high-level visit from China to Bhutan; he was accompanied by Luo Zhaohui, the then Chinese envoy to India.

The Chinese foreign ministry statement released at the end of his visit said: “China highly values its traditional friendly relations with Bhutan, and will as always respect Bhutan’s independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity, respect the political system and development path chosen by Bhutan based on its own national conditions, and respect the independent foreign policy of peace upheld by Bhutan.”

Sirf News Network

By Sirf News Network

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